PharmTech Poll Results: OTC Children’s Medications

Dec 04, 2007
By PharmTech Editors
Untitled Document

PharmTech Poll Results: OTC Children’s Medications

The question:

The US Food and Drug Administration’s Nonprescription Drugs Advisory Committee and Pediatric Advisory Committee recently recommended that over-the-counter cough and cold medications not be given to children under age 6 based on their conclusion that the drugs have not been proven effective according to current research and there is a risk of adverse effects. The committees further recommended that dosing devices be required and standardized using volume measurements for liquid formulations.

Do you agree with the committees that there should be standardized dosing devices for all OTC children’s medications?

Your Answers:

Thanks to all of you who participated in our poll! All respondants agreed that OTC children’s medications should have standardized dosing devices.

One person commented, “These should be sold directly by the pharmacist like the pseudoephedrine formulations so the parents administering the doses understand how to use the dosing device and to make sure the patient is not taking other medication that could impact the dosing.”

To add your comments, click here.

For more on this topic, see:

Wyeth Recalls Cold Medicines, Lawmakers Urge FDA Action

FDA Committees Recommend Ban on Cough and Cold Medications for Young Children

Drug Makers Voluntarily Recall OTC Infant Cough and Cold Medications

FDA to Discuss Pediatric OTC Drugs, Warns Against Codeine Use

To see the results of our previous polls, see the poll archive.