Research Shows Protein's Ability to Prevent HIV Cell Replication - Pharmaceutical Technology

Latest Issue
PharmTech

Latest Issue
PharmTech Europe

Research Shows Protein's Ability to Prevent HIV Cell Replication


A family of proteins that promotes virus entry into cells also has the ability to block the release of HIV and other viruses, University of Missouri researchers have found. The study was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

When HIV-1 infects a cell, it replicates and spreads to other cells. T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain, or TIM-1, has previously been shown to promote entry of some highly pathogenic viruses into host cells. The MU researchers have found that the same protein possesses a unique ability to block the release of HIV-1 and Ebola virus. The TIM proteins prevent viral particles from being released from the infected cell, which may in turn slow the production of the viruses.

The researchers found that as the viral particles attempt to bud from an infected cell, the TIM-family proteins located on the surface of the cell can attach to lipids, known as phosphatidylserine (PS), on the surface of the viral particle. When the TIM-family proteins come in contact with PS, the viral particle becomes attached to the host cell, keeping the particle from being released from the cell. Because TIM-family proteins and PS are present on the surface of the cell and the viral particle, the viral particles get stuck to one another, forming a network of viral particles that accumulate on the surface of the host cell, rather than being released to infect other cells.

By using molecular, biochemical and electron microscopic approaches, the researchers observed the TIM and PS interactions in human cells. Next, the researchers plan to study the biological significance of TIM-family proteins in animals and patients and to determine the fate of the infected cell once it accumulates a buildup of viral particles.

Source: University of Missouri

ADVERTISEMENT

blog comments powered by Disqus
LCGC E-mail Newsletters

Subscribe: Click to learn more about the newsletter
| Weekly
| Monthly
|Monthly
| Weekly

Survey
FDASIA was signed into law two years ago. Where has the most progress been made in implementation?
Reducing drug shortages
Breakthrough designations
Protecting the supply chain
Expedited reviews of drug submissions
More stakeholder involvement
Reducing drug shortages
70%
Breakthrough designations
4%
Protecting the supply chain
17%
Expedited reviews of drug submissions
2%
More stakeholder involvement
7%
View Results
Eric Langerr Outsourcing Outlook Eric LangerTargeting Different Off-Shore Destinations
Cynthia Challener, PhD Ingredients Insider Cynthia ChallenerAsymmetric Synthesis Continues to Advance
Jill Wechsler Regulatory Watch Jill Wechsler Data Integrity Key to GMP Compliance
Sean Milmo European Regulatory WatchSean MilmoExtending the Scope of Pharmacovigilance Comes at a Price
New FDA Team to Spur Modern Drug Manufacturing
From Generics to Supergenerics
CMOs and the Track-and-Trace Race: Are You Engaged Yet?
Ebola Outbreak Raises Ethical Issues
Better Comms Means a Fitter Future for Pharma, Part 2: Realizing the Benefits of Unified Communications

Click here