Kansas State University to Build Bulk Solids Innovation Center - Pharmaceutical Technology

Latest Issue
PharmTech

Latest Issue
PharmTech Europe

Kansas State University to Build Bulk Solids Innovation Center



Untitled Document

Kansas State University plans to build the Kansas State University Bulk Solids Innovation Center in Salina, Kansas, for companies that design and use systems for bulk solids. The center will be used to study and increase the understanding of bulk solids materials handling.

Primary partners in the projected $3.5-million, 13,000 ft2 facility are Kansas State University, the Salina Chamber of Commerce, the Salina Economic Development Corporation, and several private companies. The university will be the key tenant in the center with various offices and research suites for permanent and visiting researchers, companies, and other users. Two local companies, K-Tron and Vortex Valves, will be initial anchor tenants and will conduct both their own research as well as collaborative research with the university.

The building will include open and enclosed laboratory areas to allow for collaborative and proprietary research projects. The open area will also allow for the more exploratory/open-access research conducted by university investigators and students. The center will incorporate Kansas State faculty from the technology, engineering, and agriculture programs. It will focus on the process industries of plastics, foods and chemicals and will complement the College of Agriculture's Bulk Solids and Particle Technology Lab and program housed on the university's Manhattan, Kansas campus. The project will use public and private sector resources, including a $1-million-plus grant through the Economic Development Assistance Programs of the US Department of Commerce's Economic Development Administration.

Source: K-Tron

ADVERTISEMENT

blog comments powered by Disqus
LCGC E-mail Newsletters

Subscribe: Click to learn more about the newsletter
| Weekly
| Monthly
|Monthly
| Weekly

Survey
FDASIA was signed into law two years ago. Where has the most progress been made in implementation?
Reducing drug shortages
Breakthrough designations
Protecting the supply chain
Expedited reviews of drug submissions
More stakeholder involvement
Reducing drug shortages
32%
Breakthrough designations
8%
Protecting the supply chain
40%
Expedited reviews of drug submissions
8%
More stakeholder involvement
12%
View Results
Jim Miller Outsourcing Outlook Jim Miller Health Systems Raise the Bar on Reimbursing New Drugs
Cynthia Challener, PhD Ingredients Insider Cynthia ChallenerThe Mainstreaming of Continuous Flow API Synthesis
Jill Wechsler Regulatory Watch Jill Wechsler Industry Seeks Clearer Standards for Track and Trace
Siegfried Schmitt Ask the Expert Siegfried SchmittData Integrity
Sandoz Wins Biosimilar Filing Race
NIH Translational Research Partnership Yields Promising Therapy
Clusters set to benefit from improved funding climate but IP rights are even more critical
Supplier Audit Program Marks Progress
FDA, Drug Companies Struggle with Compassionate Use Requests

Click here