CDER Gains Woodcock as Permanent Chief - Pharmaceutical Technology

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CDER Gains Woodcock as Permanent Chief


ePT--the Electronic Newsletter of Pharmaceutical Technology

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Rockville, MD (Mar. 11)—Much to the surprise of most close observers of the Food and Drug Administration, Janet Woodcock agreed last month to resume control of the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research (CDER). She headed CDER for 10 years before being promoted to deputy commissioner and, more recently, FDA chief medical officer, both positions she will relinquish to take on her new role. When CDER Director Steven Galson left last year, Woodcock became temporary CDER chief. After a long search for a replacement, she has decided to take on the job herself.

Woodcock returns as head of CDER at a difficult time for the organization. A main task is to implement the myriad provisions of the FDA Amendments Act (FDAAA), which involves writing new rules and guidances, as well as expanding programs and operations on many fronts. The good news is that CDER has added resources to hire some 700 additional staffers; the bad news is that the hiring and training process will consume considerable time and energy.

Pharmaceutical companies applauded the move, and were relieved to see a well-known and highly regarded old hand take the reins. Woodcock demonstrated that she has the political skills necessary to deal with a highly belligerent Congress in responding to sharp questioning a few weeks ago from the House Appropriations subcommittee that oversees FDA’s budget. Woodcock is sure to have many more experiences of the sort, as the legislators probe FDA’s funding needs, oversight of clinical trials, field-inspection system, as well as drug- and food-safety monitoring. While agency critics continue to question FDA’s ability to keep harmful medical products off the market, patient advocates and their allies press for faster access to life-saving therapies. Heading CDER right now is a tough job, and FDA is lucky to have Woodcock willing to take it on.

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