McNeil Voluntarily Recalls Infants' Tylenol Oral Suspension Product - Pharmaceutical Technology

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McNeil Voluntarily Recalls Infants' Tylenol Oral Suspension Product


ePT--the Electronic Newsletter of Pharmaceutical Technology

On Feb. 17, 2012, McNeil Consumer Healthcare, a division of McNeil-PPC, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, voluntarily recalled approximately 574,000 bottles of its over-the-counter pain reliever and fever-reducer Infants’ Tylenol Oral Suspension, 1 oz. Grape. The voluntary recall was initiated after consumers complained of having difficulty using the SimpleMeasure dosing system.

The SimpleMeasure dosing system used for Infants’ Tylenol includes a dosing syringe that is inserted into a flow restrictor at the top of the bottle to measure dosage. Complaints were received from some consumers that the flow restrictor was pushed into the bottle when the syringe was inserted.

McNeil states, in a press release, that the voluntary recall was at the wholesale and retail level for seven lots distributed nationwide in the United States and that no adverse events have been reported. McNeil states that consumers may continue to use the product “provided that the flow restrictor at the top of the bottle remains in place,” but cautions consumers to not use the product if the flow restrictor is pushed into the bottle.

The specific lot numbers recalled were BIL0U00, BIL0V00, BIL3500, BJL2D00, BJL2E00, BJL2T00, BJL2U00, UPC Code 300450122308. Consumers can request a refund from McNeil by visiting www.tylenol.com.

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