Interphex Focuses on Counterfeit Prevention - Pharmaceutical Technology

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Interphex Focuses on Counterfeit Prevention
Interphex provided an opportunity to examine the latest pharmaceutical packaging concepts and packaging machines.


Pharmaceutical Technology


To meet new prescription drug information requirements, inserts and outserts have expanded in size to accommodate additional information, multiple languages, and larger type sizes. To fold these poster-size sheets, an electronically controlled, double-knife system creates as many as 130 panels. For example, a 27 39-in. sheet can be folded into 120 panels for a finished size of 2.75 3.25 in. by about 0.5-in. thick ("MV-2005 Outsert System," Vijuk Equipment, Inc., Elmhurst, IL, http://www.vijukequip.com/).

Equipment

Interphex was the world premier for two nested syringe-filling machines: one low-speed with 2 rotary piston pumps and one high-speed with 10 pumps. The presterilized glass or plastic syringes travel through the machines in their 100-count nests and are filled, inspected, and resealed at maximum rates of 80 or 500 syringes/min, respectively. Fill volumes range from 0.5 to 50 mL. Equipment can be supplied with an integrated isolator and particle-inspection system ("FSX 2020" low-speed and "FSX 5100" high-speed nested syringe fillers, "CVT Slitec" particle-inspection system, Bosch Packaging Technology, Inc., Minneapolis, MN, http://www.boschpackaging.com/).

A compact monoblock for pilot or biopharmaceutical applications is small enough to move through a standard doorway. Capable of handling 1–100-mL vials, the machine fills and closes as many as 60 containers/min. Tool-free changeover and a starwheel bottle adjustment reduce changeover time to less than 5 min. The $39,000 machine can be integrated with an isolator or laminar-flow cabinet. Customers transitioning from a manual process can use the same pump. An onboard help manual resides in the operator interface and includes operating procedures, troubleshooting, and maintenance information in six languages ("DCM-100," Dabrico Inc., Bourbonnais, IL, http://www.dabrico.com/).

Wide-mouth containers with neck diameters ranging from 58 to 130 mm can be induction sealed at speeds of 200 ft/ min without skewing the head to increase sealing dwell time. Solid-state unit eliminates fans, filters, and water (wide sealing head, Lepel Corp., Edgewood, NY, http://www.cap-sealing.com/).

An easy-to-use, nondestructive blister packaging inspector uses vacuum decay and vision imaging to detect and pinpoint the location of package-integrity problems during a 10-s test cycle without stressing seals. Compatible with any combination of printed or unprinted paper, film or foil, the unit detects leaks as small as 5 μm. Changeover occurs in seconds with a quick swap of tooling. An automatic recognition feature on each test tool enables the system to identify the blister format and automatically set test parameters ("VeriPac 225/BLV," Packaging Technologies and Inspection, LLC, Tuckahoe, NY, http://www.ptiusa.com/).

Distribution packaging

Pharmaceutical packagers often specify plastic pallets because of concerns about particulate generation and cleanliness of wooden pallets. In addition, wooden pallets used for export shipments must meet phytosanitary standards. These international rules require wooden pallets to undergo a certified treatment to ensure insects that could damage trees are not transported outside their native areas.

A plastic pallet designed for export applications consists primarily of recycled, high-density polyethylene and provides a dynamic capacity of 2500 lbs. Priced at about $12 each, the design of the lightweight, 17-lb compression-molded 48 40-in. pallet permits 240 pallets to fit on a truck, thus saving $0.50–1.00 per pallet in shipping ("RPX 4840" export pallet, Rehrig Pacific Co., De Soto, KS, http://www.rehrigpacific.com/).

Hallie Forcinio is Pharmaceutical Technology's Packaging Forum editor, 4708 Morningside Drive, Cleveland, OH 44109, tel. 216.351.5824, fax 216.351.5684,


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