Roger Dabbah, PhD - Pharmaceutical Technology

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Roger Dabbah, PhD


Roger Dabbah, PhD is a Pharmtech editorial advisory board (EAB) member

Roger Dabbah, PhD
Principal Consultant,
Tri-Intersect Solutions

Roger Dabbah is currently principal consultant for Tri-Intersect Solutions, which he founded in April 2006. He consults in the areas of science, technology, and the management of technology in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry. He has authored two books, published widely on a variety of topics, and made numerous presentations at national and international scientific meetings.

Dabbah is also a director on the board of the PDA Foundation for Pharmaceutical Sciences. He was the chair of the fundraising committee and now is the chair of the communication committee. He is also on the editorial board of a number of publications, including Pharmaceutical Technology, Bioprocess International, and others.

Dabbah was senior scientific fellow in the Department of Drug Standard Development, at the US Pharmacopeia. He tracked new technologies such as nanotechnology and all the “omics” technologies (genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, bioinformatics, genetic testing, stem cells research) to position USP standards in the future. He was the USP representative to AAMI, ANSI, IEST, PDA, BIO and worked in a number of US-Technical Advisory Groups involved in ISO Technical Committees. He was also the US representative to the WHO Biological Standardization Committee in Geneva.

Dabbah was previously director, Complex Actives Division in the Information and Standards Division of USP, which he joined in 1986. His responsibilities included management of liaisons with the USP Council of Experts, Industry, Government and Academia in the various areas of biologicals, biotechnology, gene therapy, tissue engineering, microbiology, devices and diagnostics, toxicity testing, biocompatibility, alternatives to animal testing, international harmonization in biotechnology and microbiology, parenterals, radiopharmaceuticals, and pharmaceutical waters. Before joining USP, he had extensive industrial experience in major multinationals in the areas of sterilization, immunology, R&D, information sciences, research, and technology management.

Dabbah earned his PhD degree at the University of Maryland, his MS and BA at the University of Minnesota, and an MBA at the University of Dayton in Ohio. He has served as an associate professor in technology management at the University of Maryland University College Graduate School; as a faculty practitioner at the Johns Hopkins University Whiting Graduate School of Engineering; and at the JHU Continuous Education Graduate School, where he teaches in the technology management graduate program and in the information systems program.

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