Bioburden Method Suitability for Cleaning and Sanitation Monitoring: How Far Do We Have to Go? - Pharmaceutical Technology

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Bioburden Method Suitability for Cleaning and Sanitation Monitoring: How Far Do We Have to Go?
The author reviews test methods for microbiological cleaning processes and suggests ways to improve microbial bioburden method suitability studies.


Pharmaceutical Technology
Volume 34, Issue 8

References

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