The Future of Clinical Service Provider-Sponsor Relationships - Pharmaceutical Technology

Latest Issue
PharmTech

Latest Issue
PharmTech Europe

The Future of Clinical Service Provider-Sponsor Relationships
The author analyzes the results of a survey that polled pharmaceutical executives and managers about both sides of the outsourcing relationship. Read this and other preferred organization articles in this special issue.


Pharmaceutical Technology
Volume 35, pp. s30-s41


Figure 4: Sponsors' levels of satisfaction with the work that clinical service providers have done.
The data were examined to determine whether a relationship existed between a great fraction of outsourcing spending allocated to preferred providers and a high level of satisfaction with the work performed or the value received (see Figure 4). Sponsor respondents whose companies allocated 75% or more of their clinical-outsourcing budgets to preferred providers were about as likely to be satisfied with the work performed as were respondents whose companies allocated less to preferred providers, and were more likely to be satisfied than were companies without preferred providers. However, respondents whose companies allocated 75% or more of their clinical-outsourcing budgets to preferred providers were less likely to be dissatisfied with clinical service providers' performance than were those that allocated less.


Figure 5: Sponsors' levels of satisfaction with the value received for the money spent on clinical service providers.
Differences between the groups were more pronounced when the value received for the money spent on clinical service providers was examined. Figure 5 shows that respondents from companies without preferred providers were far less likely to be satisfied with the value received than were respondents from companies with preferred providers, and the fraction that was satisfied increased with increased allocation of spending to these relationships. Likewise, only 5% of respondents from companies that allocated 75% or more of their clinical-outsourcing spending to preferred providers were dissatisfied with the value obtained, whereas 33% of those from companies without preferred providers were dissatisfied.


Figure 6: What sponsor companies expected of their preferred providers in the recent past (2007–2009).
Altered expectations of preferred providers. In keeping with their need for efficient, high-performing outsourcing relationships, sponsors as a group anticipate increasing their demands on the providers they choose for preferred relationships, to the point where these relationships come to resemble what are commonly referred to in the industry as partnerships. In the survey, sponsor respondents were provided with a list of items and asked to indicate whether they always expected, sometimes expected, or did not expect each one of preferred providers. They were asked first to reflect on their expectations in the immediate past (i.e., 2007–2009), and then to reflect on their expectations moving forward (i.e., 2010 and beyond). Figure 6 shows that, between 2007 and 2009, discounted rates was the only item that was always expected of preferred providers by the majority of respondents. Increased oversight by providers' senior management ranked second, and access to specific staff members ranked third. The remainder of the items listed were always expected by less than a quarter of respondents and were not expected by a quarter or more.


Figure 7: What sponsor companies expect from their preferred providers in 2010 and beyond.
For 2010 and beyond, however, expectations of preferred providers changed considerably (see Figure 7). Except for advice or input regarding strategic planning, all items listed were always expected by at least half of sponsor respondents, and were not expected by 13% or less.


ADVERTISEMENT

blog comments powered by Disqus
LCGC E-mail Newsletters

Subscribe: Click to learn more about the newsletter
| Weekly
| Monthly
|Monthly
| Weekly

Survey
FDASIA was signed into law two years ago. Where has the most progress been made in implementation?
Reducing drug shortages
Breakthrough designations
Protecting the supply chain
Expedited reviews of drug submissions
More stakeholder involvement
Reducing drug shortages
32%
Breakthrough designations
11%
Protecting the supply chain
37%
Expedited reviews of drug submissions
11%
More stakeholder involvement
11%
View Results
Jim Miller Outsourcing Outlook Jim Miller Health Systems Raise the Bar on Reimbursing New Drugs
Cynthia Challener, PhD Ingredients Insider Cynthia ChallenerThe Mainstreaming of Continuous Flow API Synthesis
Jill Wechsler Regulatory Watch Jill Wechsler Industry Seeks Clearer Standards for Track and Trace
Siegfried Schmitt Ask the Expert Siegfried SchmittData Integrity
Sandoz Wins Biosimilar Filing Race
NIH Translational Research Partnership Yields Promising Therapy
Clusters set to benefit from improved funding climate but IP rights are even more critical
Supplier Audit Program Marks Progress
FDA, Drug Companies Struggle with Compassionate Use Requests
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology,
Click here