Solid Microstructured Transdermal Delivery Highlighted at Controlled Release Society's Meeting

July 17, 2008
Patricia Van Arnum
ePT--the Electronic Newsletter of Pharmaceutical Technology

3M Drug Delivery Systems has successfully designed a proof of concept device using a solid microstructured transdermal system for the systemic delivery of high-potency pharmaceuticals. The technology was showcased at a poster session at the annual meeting of the Controlled Release Society held this week in New York City.

St. Paul, MN (July 15)-3M Drug Delivery Systems successfully designed a proof of concept device using a solid microstructured transdermal system (sMTS) for the systemic delivery of high-potency pharmaceuticals. The technology was showcased at a poster session at the annual meeting of the Controlled Release Society held this week in New York City.

John K. Simons, microstructured transdermal project manager at 3M, explained the in vivo data, which included depth of penetration, timed release, and demonstration of systemic delivery.

He reported that delivery of naloxone via an sMTS patch was found to be comparable to a subcutaneous injection with regard to bioavailability and pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. Additionally, time-release data showed that the dosage was delivered very quickly after the patch was placed on the skin, with the majority of the initial array content delivered within 30 s. This data, coupled with the systemic delivery studies, showed systemic delivery is possible with coated microstructures.

"These studies demonstrate that our sMTS technology can quickly and effectively deliver molecules not typically compatible with traditional transdermal technologies into the bloodstream,” said Simons in a company press release. “The sMTS provides delivery that combines the ease and convenience of a transdermal patch with the speed and efficiency of a subcutaneous injection."

3M's sMTS technology has been used for vaccine delivery. Under sMTS delivery, the microstructures can penetrate the stratum corneum with minimal patient discomfort, and provide a delivery route for drugs typically available only via injection, according to 3M.