Novel Polymer-DNA Delivery System for Drugs, DNA

March 1, 2007
Pharmaceutical Technology Editors
ePT--the Electronic Newsletter of Pharmaceutical Technology

Enschede, Netherlands (Feb. 26)-Scientists from the University of Twente?s MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology have designed a novel delivery system by combining synthetic iron-containing polymers with DNA macromolecules.

Enschede, Netherlands (Feb. 26)-Scientists from the University of Twente’s MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology (www.utwente.nl/en) have designed a novel delivery system by combining synthetic iron-containing polymers with DNA macromolecules.

When the polymer is wrapped around the DNA, they are bonded electrostatically, and the process generates spherical, porous structures capable of carrying and delivering drugs and DNA fragments. The pores are larger than 50 nm.

Local delivery is possible using small molecules to oxidize the iron and break the bond between the DNA and polymer. This process also can be used to free DNA fragments from the sphere and apply them in gene therapy.

The research team, led by professors Julius Vancso (MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology) and Helmuth Mohwald (Max Planck Institut für Kolloid und Grenzflächenforschung, Golm, Germany, www.mpikg-golm.mpg.de), published their study in the Feb. 26 issue of Angewandte Chemie International Edition.